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OOPS! HOW’S THAT AGAIN? | Class 11 English notes

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OOPS! HOW’S THAT AGAIN? Summary in Short

OOPS! HOW’S THAT AGAIN

OOPS! HOW’S THAT AGAIN? | Class 11 English notes

OOPS! How’s that again” by Roser Rosenblatt is about the types of verbal mistakes human beings committee. When they talk to each other he classifies the mistakes into several parts and gives a famous example of the same in order to justify it. Likewise, he explains the reasons behind committing these verbal mistakes along with their importance in human life.

According to the author, the commonest verbal mistake is ‘slip of tongue’ generally committed by everyone. It occurs when speakers ones to say something but he means another. For e.g.; - Prince Charles was wished for his happy conjugal life with lady jane by a famous businessman. But he was getting engaged with Lady Diana. In fact, lady jane was his former beloved. Similarly, “faux pas” is another verbal mistake that can devastate the effect on both who speak it and who hear it. It occurs when the speaker without ill intention produces a wrong word instead correct one and it is taken negatively by the listener. For eg, The mayor of Chicago made a faux pas when he said, “The policeman is not there to create disorder, the policeman is there to preserve (prevent) disorder.”

Mistranslation” accounts for a great share of verbal mistakes. It happens when a speaker attempts to translate one language into another by knowing the meaning. The slogan, “come alive with pepsi” was badly translated in Germany as “come alive out the grave with Pepsi.” It was even more badly translated elsewhere in the world. Similarly, the president of Germany Henrich Lubke frightened Indian president, “who are you” instead of “how are you” likewise “Blooper” is another type of mistake radio and television. Harry Vonzell, A great announcer of radio made Blooper, “portion of women on the run”. While he was giving commentary moreover, “spoonerism” is a deliberate type of mistake that takes place when the words having some sounds are mixed up. William Archibald of Oxford university made spoonerism when he scolds at his students saying “ you have hissed(missed) all my mystery(history) lectures. In fact, you have tested(wasted) the whole worn(term) and most leave by the first town (down) drain (train).

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